Drug Use: How expired are 'expired drugs' for Bauchi rural dwellers?

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Charly Agwam FASLN

Investigation revealed that for many rural dwellers in Bauchi State Nigeria, drugs only expire when and if their local dispensers (usually sellers of drugs in small shops, also called chemist) say so. At least 68 percent of rural patients interviewed said that they only rely on the discretion of their local dispenser for safety and efficacy of non-prescription drugs they buy over-the-counter.

Benefit Of Honey In The Management of Surgical Wounds

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Abdulsalam Mahmud, FASLN

A research by a group of Nigerian Scientists at the Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU), Ile-Ife, in Osun State, Dr. Ezekiel Akinkunmi, suggests that honeys from Nigeria would be effective alternative to antiseptic agents in the management of surgical wound infections caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureaus (MRSA) and other multidrug-resistant staphylococci.

Practicing Safe Eid-Ul-Adha In COVID-19 Era

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Abdulrahman Olagunju

As Eid-Ul- Adha is centrally based on four observances, which include Eid prayers, animal sacrifice, social gatherings and charity, here are ways in which individuals can make informed decisions during the celebration according to the WHO safety guidelines.

Fruit Flies Can Boost Research In Life And Biomedical Sciences In Nigeria

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Rashidatu Abdulazeez & Prof. Andreas Prokop

The key challenges that Nigerian scientists face are poor infrastructure and research funding. Drosophila can be an important facilitator and help to square this circle by shifting the balance between investment and outcome in our favour. As has been explained in greater detail above, “you get 10 times more biology for a dollar invested in flies than you get in mice” (Hugo Bellen), and these enormous savings would then be available for infrastructural investments to raise research standards and capabilities.

Scaling up Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) implementation in Nigeria Amid COVID-19

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Dr Jamilu Ibrahim Nikau

The international grants Nigeria is currently implementing SMC and other life-saving malaria control interventions will cease one day. Therefore, it is imperative for governments at all levels to increase resources dedicated to the fight against malaria and other infectious diseases to enable the country to attain goal 3, target 3.3 of Sustainable Development Goal (SDGs).

‘Science For The Young’: Inspiring Nigerian Secondary School Students To Pursue Science Careers

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Abdullahi Tsanni

The prospect of Nigerian secondary school students to pursue life science careers depends, to a large extent, on proper guidance and mentorship, orientation as well as having a good understanding of the opportunities that life sciences present.

No Country in Africa Invests 1% of GDP into Research--Scientists

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Abdulsalam Mahmud, FASLN

Africa, as a continent, is desirous of attaining rapid scientific growth and technological development. It is the only way for it to catch up with its peers—Europe, Asia, Central America, Australia, and South America. But at the moment, none of its 54 countries invests as much as 1% of their Gross Domestic Products (GDP) into research and development (R&D), as recommended by the African Union (AU). A university scholar, Dr. Mahmoud Bukar Maina, and some researchers said the inability to meet this R&D funding target has somewhat affected Africa’s research output and innovations.

Reference Human Genomes and the Missing African DNA

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Dr Abdulrazak Ibrahim

With recent global attention focusing on discussions around systemic racism, slavery and associated demographic shifts, the need for more knowledge about the African human genome becomes even more important. Perhaps one opportunity this offers is to underscore the need for scientists that work with reference genomes to forge partnerships that will see more centres across Africa, Asia, Europe, Americas and the rest of the world, collaborating to generate genomic data and fill the missing gap of the African DNA. This will not only help us understand our genomes better and therefore, foster drug discovery, but it may also potentially prevent the negative consequences of biases that have fed into systemic racism over the years.

Life Sciences Competition 2020: Science Communication Hub Nigeria Releases Names of Successful Candidates

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Abdullahi Tsanni

Science Communication Hub Nigeria (SciComNigeria), organizers of the maiden National Life Sciences Competition (NLSC) for secondary schools in Nigeria, have released names of 7 finalists with the highest scores out of those who wrote the qualifying essays for the competition.

MALARIA vs. COVID-19: Commemorating the World Malaria Day in the Shadow of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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WEALTH OKETE

It is needless to say that the advent of COVID-19 has overshadowed every other disease of humankind. Before COVID-19 came, we had HIV/AIDS, and diabetes, and cancers, and hepatitis, and malaria; we still have them. As a nation, we were even struggling to stifle the spread of Lassa fever; and we are still on it. But it doesn't seem like it. There were also bubbly researches and bursts of discoveries here and there, on these diseases that once mattered. But now, all of those, the diseases and discoveries have been assigned a role or two in the backdrop of a ravaging viral disease, which has invariably become the one-man band that has taken centre stage. Infact, the most relevant researches now, appear to be those directed towards discovering a cure or vaccine or 'something' about SARS-CoV-2 and its COVID-19. It's almost as if we forget too quickly that some of these diseases we no longer talk about would keep existing for years, or decades, long after COVID-19 is gone.

Coronavirus: The consequences of misinformation and how to avoid it

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Olagunju Abdulrahman FASLN

Separate ‘text’ from ‘context’ and all that remain is a con. Now more than ever, the media is central to our lives, perhaps, our window to the world. It unconsciously shapes our beliefs, mentality and ultimately, most policies that influence the public.

COVID-19 Pandemic: Time to take science seriously

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Mahmoud Bukar Maina PhD FRSA

The COVID-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic is one of the worst crises of our time. At present, over 1 million people have been infected, with over 60 000 deaths. This crisis has thrown even the most advanced countries into chaos, hit global economy hard, led to the global suspension of many activities (e.g. Sports), the lockdown of cities, quarantine of even the most influential people, e.g. The British Prime Minister. As a result of this, the world is now looking towards scientists for a long-term solution. The majority of developed countries are depending on scientific advice in designing their policies to minimise or slow the transmission of COVID-19 so as not to crash their health systems. While countries continue to use measures to “flatten the curve’, the world is earnestly watching and waiting for scientists to develop vaccines or drug to halt this pandemic. Here I summarise my reasons and some of the roadblocks affecting science in Nigeria.

Truths and Myths About COVID-19

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WEALTH OKETE

SARS-CoV-2 is the technical 'code' name for the virus that has levelled the padded shoulders of world giants, and brought us all to the familiar groove of suffering. It stands for, 'severe acute respiratory syndrome - coronavirus - 2'. It is a coronavirus; a family of viruses, so named for their 'crownlike' surface features. Although, there are several conspiracy theories surrounding the origin of the novel Coronavirus, scientific research has not left us without a reliable perspective.

Novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 not artificially made, genomic study debunked

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Umar Ahmad

Many people are wondering whether the COVID-19 naturally evolved or is artificially, a man-made construct from the laboratory.

COVID–19: ABIN DA YAKAMATA A SANI GAME DA CUTAR MURAR MASHAKO

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Dr Abubakar Sadeed

MENENE CUTAR MURAR MASHAKO (COVID19)?
Cutar murar mashaƙo (COVID19) tana daya daga cikin cututtukan nunfashin dake yiwa dan-adam lahani, wacce ta kansa zazzabi mai tsanani...

Op-Ed: The Chinese novel Coronavirus outbreak and how its spread could affect Africa, by Adam Mustapha PhD

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Dr Adam Mustapha

The world was ushered into the New Year, 2020, by a novel and unusual virus that is associated with pneumonia-like symptoms of zoonotic origin.

Surviving without fossil fuels

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Editor

Science is a discipline that is heavily dependent upon experimentation as such funding, and well-equipped laboratories are basic requirements necessary for a successful science teaching and research. Unfortunately, these are inadequate in Nigeria and therefore, in my opinion, pose the biggest challenge to scientists in Nigeria.

Science Communication Hub Nigeria founder wins Kroto award for public engagement in Brighton, UK

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Science Communication Hub Nigeria

Dr. Mahmoud Bukar Maina, the founder of Science Communication Hub Nigeria, has emerged winner of the first Kroto award for public engagement, last week, at the University of Sussex`s Life Sciences Research Symposium, in Brighton, UK.

"My dream has always been, not only to contribute to Science but to the whole of humanity." says Dr. Bashir

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Ali M Bukar

Today, we are excited to present Dr. Bashir, a post-doctoral research fellow at the prestigious Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California, USA. His research works to find a solution to network traffic congestion on Energy Science Network(EsNet).

HIV/AIDS: What is it?

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Olagunju A. Adewuyi

The global community last week observed the 2019 World AIDS Day

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